"Make the work you wish you were making." Inspiration from Keetra Dean Dixon.
The future is not a spectator sport.
Design Workbench
  • On the Workbench… an Update

    November 11, 2015
  • Don’t Miss The Film Titles!

    March 23, 2015
  • Where Do You Start Designing When There’s No Problem?

    October 25, 2014
Design Workbench On Instagram
“Make the work you wish you were making.” Inspiration from Keetra Dean Dixon.
  • Field research for the End of Life Decisions project includes coffee shop talks. Go where the people are.
  • Usability facepalm.
  • Impromptu art humor at its finest.
  • The "As Seen on TV" aisle is an adventure in visual rhetoric. Ethos, pathos, logos.
  • How does a design function when not in use? My @lodgecastiron fry basket handle folds up for small storage. Smart.
Design Workbench has two purposes: to clarify design research, education, and practice and to encourage new discoveries on how each of these areas can address problems people face. Through this network of online “workbenches,” participants can engage with projects as they progress and guests can observe design in action.

Active Workbenches

  • Rewarding Risk

    Learning beyond curriculum.
  • Living Values

    Exploring how to empower people to make decisions for their last days so their wishes are honored.


Design researchers are pioneering new modes of healthcare, clarifying how people engage with technologies, inspecting the effects of an increasingly global community, and they are testing living spaces that adapt to changing human needs. Their inquiring nature, attention to detail, experience working with others, and inventive spirit make designers collaborative problem solvers whose research produces insightful discoveries.


Design educators synthesize research, practice, and pedagogy in order to facilitate experiences where the future of design is shaped. Emerging technologies, ideas, and methods for framing problems are tested in classrooms and studios where dialogue is encouraged and learners develop their craft as well as their thinking.


Design practitioners are problem solvers who partner with clients to define needs, craft solutions, and implement inventive and effective outcomes. These designers are experienced in considering context as part of the problem and the outcomes they generate shape the cultures of those for whom they create.
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